Discovering Quoits

I was thinking about how I could incorporate some hands-on activities for the boys in Room 13. As the teacher, I discovered the Quoits game and it just so happened that Qu was the digraph for the week. From there the learning opportunities snowballed. Leanne Jackson

Room 13 used the game across several curriculum areas. The first was Physical Education. Quoits uses the whole body and encourages balance and  eye and hand coordination. It develops students' ability to follow a set of specific movements. 

When I turned around the other way it was easier for me to throw the ring and get closer to the sticks.    Ava

It is really balancing. You have to really focus and look at where you want to throw the ring.   Emmy

It helps me to  focus on one thing. Normally, you focus on the stick you want to throw the ring onto.   Aria

It helps me focus my brain on the middle stick. I am very likely to get a ring on the middle stick because I am good at throwing.   Liam

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During Mathematics, the Quoits game provided multiple opportunities to practise a range of mathematical skills. These included measuring, probability and practising  adding in tens and hundreds. For example, the first player to reach five hundred points is the winner, so students had to keep track of their numbers and add in 100’s. For measurement, students used meter rulers to measure the distances of the various rings and worked together to ensure there were no gaps or overlapping when measuring. Those who were not confident using the three-meter rulers, were supported by their peers and there were lots of great conversations.  Lastly, we started to explore the basics of probability. We discussed if the ring was unlikely or likely to hit the pegs, and why or why not.

It is helping me learn the numbers. I will be proud of myself.   Shyre

Playing quoits is giving me more ideas to work with numbers. I can count on in 10’s and I am learning more numbers.   Matthew

There is a 30 points and a 20 points. That makes 50 points. So you only need another 50 points to make 100.   Sienna

I am learning how to play quoits and learning how to add numbers to 100.  Kase

The last curriculum area that Quoits helped us learn about was Science

Students thought about the “force” they would need to use to throw the ring and hit the target. Discussions were made about why or why not they were successful. Some students even linked this to some previous learning we had done previously.

For such a simple game, Quoits has been a really great learning tool that Room 13 have integrated across the curriculum. But best of all, it was lots of fun.

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Keywords: integrated movement, social skills, measuring, numeracy development, probability

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